Taiwo Egunjobi

4 Posts Back Home

Fiyin Gambo on breaking into Nollywood

It’s a new decade and thousands of hopefuls are looking to push on with their efforts to break into the industry. It’s the same narrative everywhere; a select few privileged to be in the know, churning out the movies, while a teeming crowd of wannabes circle around, praying for just one chance to show the stuff they are made of. The bigger problem, however, is how to plan for an industry that’s changing every day.  Marketing approaches are taking new dimensions, storytelling models are evolving, even the language and politics of cinema, globally and locally, has been subject to change as well.  Fiyin Gambo is a relatively new name on the lips of many in the film circle and not only has he managed to break in, he has done so with quite some style. Film Kaku had a talk with Fiyin Gambo to learn how he pulled it off.…

Ema Edosio’s advice to aspiring filmmakers

Award winning director, Ema Edosio burst onto the scene in 2018 with Kasala, a vivid portrayal of Lagos and the struggles of four young men. The low budget film Kasala picked up festival laurels across the world, getting selections in over 30 film festivals and has has been translated to French, Portuguese and Spanish. While announcing the film’s recent acquisition by Netflix, Ema was kind enough to share vital filmmaking advice on a series of social media posts. Let’s examine some of them: 1. Dear filmmakers, please don’t give up, don’t compromise. You can be different and create films you believe in. Filmmaking anywhere is tough, and may seem insurmountable to most, especially in Nigeria, with the existing infrastructural and institutional problems. Mainstream business models in Nollywood have enforced genres and tropes on filmmakers hoping to make a profit at the box office or on VOD platforms. This means directors with…

Dami Orimogunje on Creating a Distinct Style

“I’d like to be for cinema what Shakespeare was for theatre,Marx for politics & Freud for psychology.” Every filmmaker is influenced by some other filmmaker in diverse forms, whether that’s by picking up a style of dialogue, an approach to art direction, pacing, cinematography or music. And usually, this subtle transference is usually obvious enough to make some form of connection. With several short films and a feature film in post, Damilola Orimogunje is mastering his own style, drawing heavily from his favourite filmmakers. Constantly referencing Asian auteurs, Orimogunje’s handle on the visual language of cinema shines through with projects like Mo and Losing My Religion. Not to limit his abilities to his visual brilliance, Orimogunje’s writing is also impressively distinct, unlike his peers, writing simple stories with serious themes, unburdened by the need to subscribe to the romantic comedy staple of Nollywood. Film Kaku sat down with Dami…

How Jade Osiberu Uses Colour to Create Mood

If your colour choices are just incidental, you’re probably using your colours wrongly.  Award winning director and producer, Jade Osiberu, is one of the most exciting storytellers in the Nigerian film industry. Emerging from Ndani TV and subsequently debuting strongly on the cinema scene with Isoken, a lushly executed drama that was well received by audiences and critics alike, Osiberu has shown a commitment to an aesthetic arrangement based on bold colour choices. Spanish painter Pablo Picasso once said that colours, like features, follow the changes of emotions. This appears to be the underlying philosophy behind Jade’s artistic intentions. Credited as production designer on her projects, she retains a direct control on the colours that appear on screen, a quality often associated with auteurs. Her work so far has been largely restricted to drama and romance, deeply rooted in Lagos pop-culture: With Gidi up, she burst onto the scene, telling…

Navigate