Film Production

Six Filmmaking Tips from Imoh Umoren

At a special BAFTA: A Life in Pictures Event, Ridley Scott told filmmakers present that they had no excuses not to go out and make a movie. He cited the availability of modern technologies as 70% of previously daunting barriers eliminated. Typical of the average Nigerian filmmaker, it is easy to assume that the context over there is different from ours by pointing out to the familiar mitigating factors, but the truth remains that there has never been a better time for the Nigerian filmmaker to make a film. Cameras of different types are available just about everywhere. Even better, the average smart phone can conveniently shoot and as well edit films. Film Kaku recently had an interview with Nigerian Filmmaker, Imoh Umoren, where his filmmaking journey was discussed. The director of Children of Mud, The Herbert Macaulay Affair and Dear Bayo certainly knows a lot about working your way…

The Artist that inspires Abba Makama

Director Abba Makama has created some of the most visually and thematically interesting films in Africa in recent times thanks in part to the art that inspires him. Dodorowsky, as he’s fondly called, is regarded as one of the freshest African voices, making a killing at major film festivals like Toronto International Film Festival(Tiff), twice now, with his films Green White Green and The Lost Okoroshi. Along with CJ Obasi and Michael Gouken of the Surreal 16 collective, his unique brand of storytelling combines elements of/from masquerades, dreamscapes, art, music, dance and more importantly, his greatest inspiration, Alejandro Jodorowksy, a Chilean-French Artist, who has worked as a screenwriter, a poet, a playwright, an essayist, a film and theater director and producer, an actor, a film editor, a comic writer, a musician and composer, a philosopher, a puppeteer, a mime, a psychologist and psychoanalyst, a draughtsman, a painter, a sculptor,…

Fiyin Gambo on breaking into Nollywood

It’s a new decade and thousands of hopefuls are looking to push on with their efforts to break into the industry. It’s the same narrative everywhere; a select few privileged to be in the know, churning out the movies, while a teeming crowd of wannabes circle around, praying for just one chance to show the stuff they are made of. The bigger problem, however, is how to plan for an industry that’s changing every day.  Marketing approaches are taking new dimensions, storytelling models are evolving, even the language and politics of cinema, globally and locally, has been subject to change as well.  Fiyin Gambo is a relatively new name on the lips of many in the film circle and not only has he managed to break in, he has done so with quite some style. Film Kaku had a talk with Fiyin Gambo to learn how he pulled it off.…

Ema Edosio’s advice to aspiring filmmakers

Award winning director, Ema Edosio burst onto the scene in 2018 with Kasala, a vivid portrayal of Lagos and the struggles of four young men. The low budget film Kasala picked up festival laurels across the world, getting selections in over 30 film festivals and has has been translated to French, Portuguese and Spanish. While announcing the film’s recent acquisition by Netflix, Ema was kind enough to share vital filmmaking advice on a series of social media posts. Let’s examine some of them: 1. Dear filmmakers, please don’t give up, don’t compromise. You can be different and create films you believe in. Filmmaking anywhere is tough, and may seem insurmountable to most, especially in Nigeria, with the existing infrastructural and institutional problems. Mainstream business models in Nollywood have enforced genres and tropes on filmmakers hoping to make a profit at the box office or on VOD platforms. This means directors with…

The Herbert Macaulay Affair director discusses Storytelling. 

Films are very difficult art forms to make. Period films are an even more difficult turf to negotiate. The problems range from fund raising, researching the story and fact-checking to avoid historical inaccuracies, scouting for fitting locations, wardrobe and much more. And in a country like ours riddled with atypical structures and narratives, the problems are bound to be even more. It’s for this reason the historical period genre has been largely ignored by Nigerian filmmakers. The sour experiences of the few that have dabbled into it in the past are enough to deter filmmakers. But not Imoh Umoren, the director of The Herbert Macaulay Affair. Imoh belongs to the recent upsurge of counter-cultural Nigerian filmmakers looking to rewrite the narrative in the country by venturing and rooting themselves in new genres. A look at his filmography reveals a daring tendency to experiment. The artistic roving eventually took him to…

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